Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), on Those Who Count ::

It is not the critic who counts: not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, because there is … Continue reading Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), on Those Who Count ::

An exercise in logical equivalence: tobacco vs. fossil fuels ::

Logical equivalence: Post-apocalyptic visions of the world plastered onto petrol pumps and the sides of airbuses. The Qantas kangaroo mad with starvation, its dead progeny rotting unbirthed in its pouch. Logical equivalence: The path dependency of society’s reliance on petroleum stigmatised through a series of isolating measures. First the suburbs, then the side roads, then the main roads, then the highways and freeways: electric cars, … Continue reading An exercise in logical equivalence: tobacco vs. fossil fuels ::

Marcus Clarke (1846-1881), on the Ocean ::

When the sea hisses, it speaks, and speech breaks the spell of terror; when it is inert, heaving noiselessly, it is dumb, and seems to brood over mischief. The ocean in a calm is like a sulky giant; one dreads that it may be meditating evil. Moreover, an angry sea looks less vast in extent than a calm one. Its mounting waves bring the horizon … Continue reading Marcus Clarke (1846-1881), on the Ocean ::

Two hundred words on a shot that rang out ::

A shot rang out. Blanks, thought Detective Hunt, the thought proving to him twice over in a single instant that he was still alive. First in the realisation’s presence in his mind. His mind was still equipping itself for business. Second in the fact within the realisation. The blanks Espinosa had subbed into Griggs’ gun had rendered his execution stayed. And yet, when Hunt raised his gun with the … Continue reading Two hundred words on a shot that rang out ::

Anzac Day: forgetting lest and going undercover ::

My grandfather served in the Second World War as an engineer. I thought, all my young life, that he observed the passage of Anzac Day with some solemnity. Turns out he didn’t observe it at all. Abhorred the thing, actually. His chief critique was similar to one Wilfred Owen leveled at war propaganda in his most famous First World War poem: ‘The old Lie: Dulce … Continue reading Anzac Day: forgetting lest and going undercover ::

Interview — Kevin Parker (Tame Impala), April 2013 ::

There is nothing left for Tame Impala to achieve beyond consolidating their success. They are a critical and commercial commodity, nationally and internationally renowned. This month (April, 2013) they are playing Coachella and Groovin’ the Moo both, not to mention another in a string of sold out east coast tours. Where their debut album, Innerspeaker, pricked a million ears, their sophomore, Lonerism, has put them squarely in the path … Continue reading Interview — Kevin Parker (Tame Impala), April 2013 ::

Welcome to Swimming With Elephants ::

My name is Ashley A. B. Thomson. Through this blog I aim to create a coherent outlet for my writing whilst also filtering through it the best of things I read, watch and listen to. I will post pictures, photos, videos, quotes and articles here. It will be a combination of old blogs, a conglomeration. It will also be new. Thank you for reading. Kind regards, AABT Continue reading Welcome to Swimming With Elephants ::