The cumulative nature of diverse reading

[This article was originally published in February 2016 on Medium.] The name I gave my commitment to not read books by men in 2015 — the No Man’s Land Reading Project — is the only original thing about it. Author Jack Heath did it in 2011 and would like you to know women write just as well if not better than men. Lilit Marcus did it in 2013 and … Continue reading The cumulative nature of diverse reading

An exercise in logical equivalence: tobacco vs. fossil fuels ::

Logical equivalence: Post-apocalyptic visions of the world plastered onto petrol pumps and the sides of airbuses. The Qantas kangaroo mad with starvation, its dead progeny rotting unbirthed in its pouch. Logical equivalence: The path dependency of society’s reliance on petroleum stigmatised through a series of isolating measures. First the suburbs, then the side roads, then the main roads, then the highways and freeways: electric cars, … Continue reading An exercise in logical equivalence: tobacco vs. fossil fuels ::

Anzac Day: forgetting lest and going undercover ::

My grandfather served in the Second World War as an engineer. I thought, all my young life, that he observed the passage of Anzac Day with some solemnity. Turns out he didn’t observe it at all. Abhorred the thing, actually. His chief critique was similar to one Wilfred Owen leveled at war propaganda in his most famous First World War poem: ‘The old Lie: Dulce … Continue reading Anzac Day: forgetting lest and going undercover ::

My Speech from “Canberra 2014: The Great Comedown” ::

[Last year, on Tuesday March 19, during You Are Here 2013 and thanks to Scissors Paper Pen, two teams of three were dubbed “for” and “against” and given the following prompt: The Canberra Centenary: a year of festivities dedicated to celebrating symmetry. But how balanced are the pros and cons associated with the Centenary’s effect on a small arts community? Should we reject it, or … Continue reading My Speech from “Canberra 2014: The Great Comedown” ::

How to Review Stuff ::

[I wrote this “how to” for a group of reviewers currently assigned by Canberra writers organisation Scissors Paper Pen, via their Papercuts program, to the 2014 You Are Here festival. They’re reviewing all sorts: theatre, dance, film, panels, music, collaborative projects, so I was general and succinct.  It is divided into two sections: “Conduct”, covering what to do whilst attending the event, and “Content”, covering … Continue reading How to Review Stuff ::

Music Journalism vs. Bluejuice’s Jake Stone ::

[What follows is my personal opinion and, though it attempts to be impartial, is a subjective retelling of events. I am no longer employed by BMA Magazine, nor do these opinions reflect the opinions of BMA Magazine or its affiliates, including but not limited to the author of the review in question, who is at this juncture satisfied with how matters were resolved between himself and … Continue reading Music Journalism vs. Bluejuice’s Jake Stone ::

Music is a legitimate discipline and radio is a poor educator ::

People should be freely allowed to purchase whatever kind of music they wish. This is a truth I’ve come to accept. Having worked in a record store, the pain of watching consumers pick out Michael Buble before Sinatra, Billie Holliday, Nat King Cole or Aretha Franklin gouged a hole in my head, but you can’t resent a person for preferring one of two items both … Continue reading Music is a legitimate discipline and radio is a poor educator ::